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Nahuala,Guatemala ---

 
August 1, 2011

Hi Friends - I'm going be updating the Terra Experience web site with pictures I took during the past several years.  Here is an example. Maria gives us a quick tour of Nahuala.
I'd appreciate your input on two questions ---    Send your comments to Lynn@terraexperience.com  THANKS!    Lynn

1)   Format for "Slideshow" and Narrative ---- I have 5 ( Option A, B, C, D and E) formats below that I can easily do with Frontpage 2003, my current web software (yes I know it is old... but I know how to use it and I haven't found the perfect replacement yet).  I'd be interested in which "slideshow" format you think is best and why.  If you know of something better that would work with my Frontpage website - great. I'm willing to give it a try.

2)  Contact and Style of Narrative --- Any comments are appreciated.  My target audience would be girls, families, teachers and others that buy Terra Experience doll clothes and other fun products to provide some basic understanding of the artisans villages and culture from which the doll clothes and other products come from.  I have done a little a little of this in the past - some examples are below

 

OPTION A   Maria gives us a quick tour of Nahuala  (Montage Option with story sidebar)


My friend, Maria gives us a short tour of her pueblo Nahuala. The center of the town is a plaza with vendors selling local produce. On one side of the plaza is the Catholic Church. On the other side is a park.  In the park we meet Maria's daughter-in-law.  She is a teacher and Maria is proud of her.

The main street has few cars and is amazingly quiet.  Maria explains that the street is closed today because of construction. As we head back to the market students pass us, heading home to lunch. 

In the market a man who sells fresh fruit under a multicolored umbrella says hello.  It's Maria's brother.  They chat and laugh and he offers us some fruit.  We continue to walk through the small daily market. The market is much larger on Saturday which is market day. Maria suggests we visit the church.

Maria explains we must be quiet in the church. I am glad my camera can take good pictures without a flash. The church offers respite from the bustle of the market. It is beautiful. Two people take a moment of their day for prayer.

Maria suggests we head to her family's home for refreshments.  But before we do, we meet another member of her extended family, her niece.

Maria waits for us while we get cookies to take to her family.  She looks reflective. I wonder what she is thinking?  She has lived in Nahuala her whole life and knows and is respected by many people

On the way we meet her cousin and his grandson. We share our cookies and are offered watermelon. No, thank you, we will eat at Maria's house.

 

OPTION B  Maria gives us a quick tour of Nahuala  (horizontal option)

My friend Maria gives us a short tour of her pueblo, Nahuala.

The center of town is a plaza with vendors selling local produce.

On one side of the plaza is the main church.

On the other side is the community park.

In the park we meet Maria's daughter-in-law.

She is a teacher in the local school.

There are few cars on the main street today. Its amazingly quiet.

Maria explains the main street is closed today because of road construction.

As we head back to the market many students head home for lunch.

In the market a man who sells fresh fruit under a mulicolored umbrella says hello.

This time it is Maria's brother and he offers us some fruit.

We walk through the rest of the small daily market.

Maria suggests we visit the church.

At the entrance of the church Maria explains we should be quiet.

I'm glad my camera can take good pictures without a flash.

Inside is a calm respite from the bustle of the market.

It is beautiful.

Youth take a moment from their day for prayer.

Maria suggest we leave and head to her family's home for refreshments.

But before we leave we run into another member of her extended family, her niece.

Maria waits for us as we pick up some cookies to share with her family.

Maria is reflective - I wonder what she is thinking?

We run into another member of Maria's extended family, her cousin and his grandson.

We share cookies and are offered some watermellon. No, thank you, we are headed to Maria's house.


OPTION C   Maria gives us a quick tour of Nahuala  (slideshow option)

For some reason in the Google Chrome browser this format appears too wide.  I have made two copies of this format one a stand-alone and one in a table with width constraint, but that doesn't seem to work either????  In the Explorer browser it doesn't seem to be a problem.  Beyond my web design/ workaround capabilities at this moment.

.

My friend, Maria gives us a short tour of her pueblo, Nahuala.eblo, Nahuala.

.

My friend, Maria gives us a short tour of her pueblo, Nahuala.eblo, Nahuala.

 

OPTION D   Maria gives us a quick tour of Nahuala 
(Montage Option Alone - put your curser over picture)

 

OPTION E   Maria gives us a quick tour of Nahuala 
(Vertical option)

My friend, Maria gives us a short tour of her pueblo, Nahuala.eblo, Nahuala.

The center of town is a plaza with vendors selling local produce.

On one side of the plaza is the Catholic church.

On the other side is the community park.

In the park we meet Maria's daughter-in-law.

She is a teacher in the local school and Maria is proud of her.

The main street has few cars and is amazingly quiet.

Maria explains the street is closed today because of construction.

As we head back to the market many students pass us, heading home for lunch.

In the market a man who sells fresh fruit under a mulicolored umbrella says hello.

This time it is Maria's brother. They chat and he offers us some fruit.

We walk through the rest of the small daily market. Saturday is market day and the market is much larger.

Maria suggests we visit the church.

At the entrance of the church Maria explains we should be quiet in the church.

I'm glad my camera can take good pictures without a flash.

Inside is a calm respite from the bustle of the market.

It is beautiful.

Youth take a moment from their day for prayer.

Maria suggest we leave and head to her family's home for refreshments.

But before we leave we run into another member of her extended family, her niece.

Maria waits for us as we pick up some cookies to share with her family.

Maria is reflective - I wonder what she is thinking? She has lived in Nahuala her whole life and knows and is respected by many people.

We run into another member of Maria's family, her cousin and his grandson.

We share cookies and are offered some watermellon. No, thank you, we will eat at Maria's house.

 

 

Lynn's notes and questions for herself (and others as I read it again and again)

  1. Should I use larger thumbnail photos?
  2. Don't use two similar photos in a row - reformat or use another.
  3. Wish I could figure out how to make the slideshow (option C) better (limited flexibility in design it seems):
    • Too wide - can't figure out how to constrain the margins
    • Would like the narrative to be at top of large picture
    • In Explorer, must click on picture to change large photo, wish would change when you hit the scroll arrow
  4. Probably a variation of A or C with narrative on the side would be the easiest to do (wouldn't have to link narrative to each picture unless had the time to do so)
  5. As I reflect on it, I am hoping that the flow of pictures and simple narrative provide a sense for and introduction to the place and the people in Nahuala, like you might get if you walked through the town with Maria. I am probably giving the slideshow to a couple 2nd or 3rd graders in my mind.  Its not particularly exciting or scholarly (full of facts)  --- kids seem to like a lot more action these days.  They will probably like the videos of Josefina riding in a launch across Lake Atitlan much better. Maybe it I link Maria to being an Abuela (Grandmother) to many in the town --- it could link better with kids. Any suggestions?  Is my language appropriate for 2 or 3rd graders (any too big words) or do I need a better story narrative or??? Is it OK too for "kids at heart" the Moms, Grandmothers, teachers and others that might also be interested in the pictures and narrative?
  6. Providing pictures and context takes time -  does it have any value for others or should I just focus on putting products on my web site?

 

 

 

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